Meret Oppenheim: a free woman, a significant representative of surrealism, and an icon of feminism

Meret Oppenheim: a free woman, a significant representative of surrealism, and an icon of feminism

Meret Oppenheim is a Swiss artist of German origin known to be a key representative of the surrealist movement. She was interested in the female perspective. Her unique designs have had a lasting effect on fashion.

Born in Berlin in 1913, she was encouraged to think beyond everyday logic from an early age.

 

 

When she was 18, she moved to Paris to study art. She gradually became part of the intimate circle of surrealists, including Marcel Duchamp and Alberto Giacometti.

During an appointment with Picasso, she wears one of the fur-covered bracelets she made for Schiaparelli. Picasso suggests that we cover all everyday objects with fur. This idea gave birth in 1936 to her most famous work: "The fur lunch."

 

 

She goes from scandalous muse of surrealism to major artist of surrealism.

Her sculptures play with everyday objects by providing a new perspective on society and gender. The themes that preoccupy her throughout her career are the indeterminacy between female and male, between animal and human, between nature and culture, dream and reality.   

 

A major and respected artist of the surrealist movement, Meret Oppenheim participated in redefining the limits of art.

 

 

Photos credits:

Photo #1:  Meret Oppenheim in a paper jacket of her own design (1976), Photo: Claude Lê Anh

Photo #2: “Sugar ring”, Photo: Dayle Bechtler-Lustenberger, Artsy

Photo #3: Bracelet fourrure”. Crédits photo : Gems and Ladders 

Photo #4: ”Déjeuner en fourrure”, 1936. Photo: The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Pro Litteris, Zurich

Photo #5: Meret Oppenheim, “Ma gouvernante”, 1936, Moderna Museet Stockholm, ADAGP, Paris

Photo #6: “Fur Gloves with Wooden Fingernails” 1936, Meret Oppenheim, Photo: Hauser & Wirth